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TG-TEKS

Page history last edited by jr1743@txstate.edu 10 years, 3 months ago

 

 

 

Math TEKS

 

 

Grade 2

(7)  Geometry and spatial reasoning. The student uses attributes to identify two- and three-dimensional geometric figures. The student compares and contrasts two- and three-dimensional geometric figures or both. The student is expected to:

     (A)  describe attributes (the number of vertices, faces, edges, sides) of two- and three-dimensional geometric figures such as      circles, polygons, spheres, cones, cylinders, prisms, and pyramids, etc.;

     (B)  use attributes to describe how 2 two-dimensional figures or 2 three-dimensional geometric figures are alike or different; and

     (C)  cut two-dimensional geometric figures apart and identify the new geometric figures formed.

(9)  Measurement. The student directly compares the attributes of length, area, weight/mass, and capacity, and uses comparative language to solve problems and answer questions. The student selects and uses nonstandard units to describe length, area, capacity, and weight/mass. The student recognizes and uses models that approximate standard units ( from both SI, also known as metric, and customary systems) of length, weight/mass, capacity, and time. The student is expected to:

     (B)  select a non-standard unit of measure such as square tiles to determine the area of a two-dimensional surface;

 

 

Grade 3

(8)  Geometry and spatial reasoning. The student uses formal geometric vocabulary. The student is expected to identify, classify, and describe two- and three-dimensional geometric figures by their attributes. The student compares two- dimensional figures, three-dimensional figures, or both by their attributes using formal geometry vocabulary.

(9)  Geometry and spatial reasoning. The student recognizes congruence and symmetry. The student is expected to:

     (A)  identify congruent two-dimensional figures;

     (B)  create two-dimensional figures with lines of symmetry using concrete models and technology; and

     (C)  identify lines of symmetry in two-dimensional geometric figures.

(11)  Measurement. The student directly compares the attributes of length, area, weight/mass, and capacity, and uses comparative language to solve problems and answer questions. The student selects and uses standard units to describe length, area, capacity/volume, and weight/mass. The student is expected to:

     (B)  use standard units to find the perimeter of a shape;

     (C)  use concrete and pictorial models of square units to determine the area of two-dimensional surfaces;

 

 

 

 

Grade 4

(8)  Geometry and spatial reasoning. The student identifies and describes attributes of geometric figures using formal geometric language. The student is expected to:

     (A)  identify and describe right, acute, and obtuse angles;

     (B)  identify and describe parallel and intersecting (including perpendicular) lines using concrete objects and pictorial models; and

     (C)  use essential attributes to define two- and three-dimensional geometric figures.

(9)  Geometry and spatial reasoning. The student connects transformations to congruence and symmetry. The student is expected to:

     (A)  demonstrate translations, reflections, and rotations using concrete models;

     (B)  use translations, reflections, and rotations to verify that two shapes are congruent; and

     (C)  use reflections to verify that a shape has symmetry.

(11)  Measurement. The student applies measurement concepts. The student is expected to estimate and measure to solve problems involving length (including perimeter) and area. The student uses measurement tools to measure capacity/volume and weight/mass. The student is expected to:

     (A)  estimate and use measurement tools to determine length (including perimeter), area, capacity and weight/mass using      standard units SI (metric) and customary;

 

 

 

Grade 5

(7)  Geometry and spatial reasoning. The student generates geometric definitions using critical attributes. The student is expected to identify essential attributes including parallel, perpendicular, and congruent parts of two- and three-dimensional geometric figures.

(8)  Geometry and spatial reasoning. The student models transformations. The student is expected to:

     (A)  sketch the results of translations, rotations, and reflections on a Quadrant I coordinate grid; and

     (B)  identify the transformation that generates one figure from the other when given two congruent figures on a Quadrant I      coordinate grid.

(10)  Measurement. The student applies measurement concepts involving length (including perimeter), area, capacity/volume, and weight/mass to solve problems. The student is expected to:

     (B)  connect models for perimeter, area, and volume with their respective formulas; and

     (C)  select and use appropriate units and formulas to measure length, perimeter, area, and volume.

 

 

 

Grade 6

(6)  Geometry and spatial reasoning. The student uses geometric vocabulary to describe angles, polygons, and circles. The student is expected to:

     (A)  use angle measurements to classify angles as acute, obtuse, or right;

     (B)  identify relationships involving angles in triangles and quadrilaterals; and

     (C)  describe the relationship between radius, diameter, and circumference of a circle.

 

(8)  Measurement. The student solves application problems involving estimation and measurement of length, area, time, temperature, volume, weight, and angles. The student is expected to:

     (B)  select and use appropriate units, tools, or formulas to measure and to solve problems involving length (including perimeter),      area, time, temperature, volume, and weight;

     (C)  measure angles;

 

 

 

Reading/Writing TEKS

 

Grade 2

(2.10)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Literary Nonfiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the varied structural patterns and features of literary nonfiction and respond by providing evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to distinguish between fiction and nonfiction.

 

(2.17)  Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:

(A)  plan a first draft by generating ideas for writing (e.g., drawing, sharing ideas, listing key ideas);

(B)  develop drafts by sequencing ideas through writing sentences;

(C)  revise drafts by adding or deleting words, phrases, or sentences;

(D)  edit drafts for grammar, punctuation, and spelling using a teacher-developed rubric; and

(E)  publish and share writing with others.

 

(2.19)  Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:

(A)  write brief compositions about topics of interest to the student;

 

(2.24)  Research/Research Plan. Students ask open-ended research questions and develop a plan for answering them. Students are expected to:

(A)  generate a list of topics of class-wide interest and formulate open-ended questions about one or two of the topics; and

(B)  decide what sources of information might be relevant to answer these questions.

 

(2.25)  Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to:

(A)  gather evidence from available sources (natural and personal) as well as from interviews with local experts;

(B)  use text features (e.g., table of contents, alphabetized index, headings) in age-appropriate reference works (e.g., picture dictionaries) to locate information; and

(C)  record basic information in simple visual formats (e.g., notes, charts, picture graphs, diagrams).

 

(2.26)  Research/Synthesizing Information. Students clarify research questions and evaluate and synthesize collected information. Students are expected to revise the topic as a result of answers to initial research questions.

 

(2.27)  Research/Organizing and Presenting Ideas. Students organize and present their ideas and information according to the purpose of the research and their audience. Students (with adult assistance) are expected to create a visual display or dramatization to convey the results of the research.

 

GRADE 3

(3.9)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Literary Nonfiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the varied structural patterns and features of literary nonfiction and respond by providing evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to explain the difference in point of view between a biography and autobiography.

 

(3.17)  Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:

(A)  plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience and generating ideas through a range of strategies (e.g., brainstorming, graphic organizers, logs, journals);

(B)  develop drafts by categorizing ideas and organizing them into paragraphs;

(C)  revise drafts for coherence, organization, use of simple and compound sentences, and audience;

(D)  edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling using a teacher-developed rubric; and

(E)  publish written work for a specific audience.

 

(3.20)  Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:

(A)  create brief compositions that:

(i)  establish a central idea in a topic sentence;

(ii)  include supporting sentences with simple facts, details, and explanations; and

(iii)  contain a concluding statement;

 

(3.25)  Research/Research Plan. Students ask open-ended research questions and develop a plan for answering them. Students are expected to:

(A)  generate research topics from personal interests or by brainstorming with others, narrow to one topic, and formulate open-ended questions about the major research topic; and

(B)  generate a research plan for gathering relevant information (e.g., surveys, interviews, encyclopedias) about the major research question.

 

(3.26)  Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to:

(A)  follow the research plan to collect information from multiple sources of information, both oral and written, including:

(i)  student-initiated surveys, on-site inspections, and interviews;

(ii)  data from experts, reference texts, and online searches; and

(iii)  visual sources of information (e.g., maps, timelines, graphs) where appropriate;

(B)  use skimming and scanning techniques to identify data by looking at text features (e.g., bold print, captions, key words, italics);

(C)  take simple notes and sort evidence into provided categories or an organizer;

(D)  identify the author, title, publisher, and publication year of sources; and

(E)  differentiate between paraphrasing and plagiarism and identify the importance of citing valid and reliable sources.

 

(3.27)  Research/Synthesizing Information. Students clarify research questions and evaluate and synthesize collected information. Students are expected to improve the focus of research as a result of consulting expert sources (e.g., reference librarians and local experts on the topic).

 

(3.28)  Research/Organizing and Presenting Ideas. Students organize and present their ideas and information according to the purpose of the research and their audience. Students are expected to draw conclusions through a brief written explanation and create a works-cited page from notes, including the author, title, publisher, and publication year for each source used.

 

 

GRADE 4

 

(4.7)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Literary Nonfiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the varied structural patterns and features of literary nonfiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to identify similarities and differences between the events and characters' experiences in a fictional work and the actual events and experiences described in an author's biography or autobiography.

 

(4.15)  Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:

(A)  plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience and generating ideas through a range of strategies (e.g., brainstorming, graphic organizers, logs, journals);

(B)  develop drafts by categorizing ideas and organizing them into paragraphs;

(C)  revise drafts for coherence, organization, use of simple and compound sentences, and audience;

(D)  edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling using a teacher-developed rubric; and

(E)  revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for a specific audience.

 

(4.18)  Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:

(A)  create brief compositions that:

(i)  establish a central idea in a topic sentence;

(ii)  include supporting sentences with simple facts, details, and explanations; and

(iii)  contain a concluding statement;

(B)  write letters whose language is tailored to the audience and purpose (e.g., a thank you note to a friend) and that use appropriate conventions (e.g., date, salutation, closing); and

(C)  write responses to literary or expository texts and provide evidence from the text to demonstrate understanding.

 

(4.23)  Research/Research Plan. Students ask open-ended research questions and develop a plan for answering them. Students are expected to:

(A)  generate research topics from personal interests or by brainstorming with others, narrow to one topic, and formulate open-ended questions about the major research topic; and

(B)  generate a research plan for gathering relevant information (e.g., surveys, interviews, encyclopedias) about the major research question.

 

(4.24)  Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to:

(A)  follow the research plan to collect information from multiple sources of information both oral and written, including:

(i)  student-initiated surveys, on-site inspections, and interviews;

(ii)  data from experts, reference texts, and online searches; and

(iii)  visual sources of information (e.g., maps, timelines, graphs) where appropriate;

(B)  use skimming and scanning techniques to identify data by looking at text features (e.g., bold print, italics);

(C)  take simple notes and sort evidence into provided categories or an organizer;

(D)  identify the author, title, publisher, and publication year of sources; and

(E)  differentiate between paraphrasing and plagiarism and identify the importance of citing valid and reliable sources.

 

(4.25)  Research/Synthesizing Information. Students clarify research questions and evaluate and synthesize collected information. Students are expected to improve the focus of research as a result of consulting expert sources (e.g., reference librarians and local experts on the topic).

 

(4.26)  Research/Organizing and Presenting Ideas. Students organize and present their ideas and information according to the purpose of the research and their audience. Students are expected to draw conclusions through a brief written explanation and create a works-cited page from notes, including the author, title, publisher, and publication year for each source used.

 

 

GRADE 5

 

(5.7)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Literary Nonfiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the varied structural patterns and features of literary nonfiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to identify the literary language and devices used in biographies and autobiographies, including how authors present major events in a person's life.

 

(5.15)  Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:

(A)  plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;

(B)  develop drafts by choosing an appropriate organizational strategy (e.g., sequence of events, cause-effect, compare-contrast) and building on ideas to create a focused, organized, and coherent piece of writing;

(C)  revise drafts to clarify meaning, enhance style, include simple and compound sentences, and improve transitions by adding, deleting, combining, and rearranging sentences or larger units of text after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;

(D)  edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and

(E)  revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

(5.18)  Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:

(A)  create multi-paragraph essays to convey information about the topic that:

(i)  present effective introductions and concluding paragraphs;

(ii)  guide and inform the reader's understanding of key ideas and evidence;

(iii)  include specific facts, details, and examples in an appropriately organized structure; and

(iv)  use a variety of sentence structures and transitions to link paragraphs;

 

(5.24)  Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to:

(A)  follow the research plan to collect data from a range of print and electronic resources (e.g., reference texts, periodicals, web pages, online sources) and data from experts;

(B)  differentiate between primary and secondary sources;

(C)  record data, utilizing available technology (e.g., word processors) in order to see the relationships between ideas, and convert graphic/visual data (e.g., charts, diagrams, timelines) into written notes;

(D)  identify the source of notes (e.g., author, title, page number) and record bibliographic information concerning those sources according to a standard format; and

(E)  differentiate between paraphrasing and plagiarism and identify the importance of citing valid and reliable sources.

 

(5.25)  Research/Synthesizing Information. Students clarify research questions and evaluate and synthesize collected information. Students are expected to:

(A)  refine the major research question, if necessary, guided by the answers to a secondary set of questions; and

(B)  evaluate the relevance, validity, and reliability of sources for the research.

 

(5.26)  Research/Organizing and Presenting Ideas. Students organize and present their ideas and information according to the purpose of the research and their audience. Students are expected to synthesize the research into a written or an oral presentation that:

(A)  compiles important information from multiple sources;

(B)  develops a topic sentence, summarizes findings, and uses evidence to support conclusions;

(C)  presents the findings in a consistent format; and

(D)  uses quotations to support ideas and an appropriate form of documentation to acknowledge sources (e.g., bibliography, works cited).

 

 

GRADE 6

 

(6.7)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Literary Nonfiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the varied structural patterns and features of literary nonfiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to identify the literary language and devices used in memoirs and personal narratives and compare their characteristics with those of an autobiography.

 

(6.14)  Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:

(A)  plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;

(B)  develop drafts by choosing an appropriate organizational strategy (e.g., sequence of events, cause-effect, compare-contrast) and building on ideas to create a focused, organized, and coherent piece of writing;

(C)  revise drafts to clarify meaning, enhance style, include simple and compound sentences, and improve transitions by adding, deleting, combining, and rearranging sentences or larger units of text after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;

(D)  edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and

(E)  revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

(6.17)  Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:

(A)  create multi-paragraph essays to convey information about a topic that:

(i)  present effective introductions and concluding paragraphs;

(ii)  guide and inform the reader's understanding of key ideas and evidence;

(iii)  include specific facts, details, and examples in an appropriately organized structure; and

(iv)  use a variety of sentence structures and transitions to link paragraphs;

(D)  produce a multimedia presentation involving text and graphics using available technology.

 

(A)  brainstorm, consult with others, decide upon a topic, and formulate open-ended questions to address the major research topic; and

(B)  generate a research plan for gathering relevant information about the major research question.

 

(6.23)  Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to:

(A)  follow the research plan to collect data from a range of print and electronic resources (e.g., reference texts, periodicals, web pages, online sources) and data from experts;

(B)  differentiate between primary and secondary sources;

(C)  record data, utilizing available technology (e.g., word processors) in order to see the relationships between ideas, and convert graphic/visual data (e.g., charts, diagrams, timelines) into written notes;

(D)  identify the source of notes (e.g., author, title, page number) and record bibliographic information concerning those sources according to a standard format; and

(E)  differentiate between paraphrasing and plagiarism and identify the importance of citing valid and reliable sources.

 

(6.24)  Research/Synthesizing Information. Students clarify research questions and evaluate and synthesize collected information. Students are expected to:

(A)  refine the major research question, if necessary, guided by the answers to a secondary set of questions; and

(B)  evaluate the relevance and reliability of sources for the research.

 

(6.25)  Research/Organizing and Presenting Ideas. Students organize and present their ideas and information according to the purpose of the research and their audience. Students are expected to synthesize the research into a written or an oral presentation that:

(A)  compiles important information from multiple sources;

(B)  develops a topic sentence, summarizes findings, and uses evidence to support conclusions;

(C)  presents the findings in a consistent format; and

(D)  uses quotations to support ideas and an appropriate form of documentation to acknowledge sources (e.g., bibliography, works cited).

 

 

 

 

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