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PR - Lesson Plans- Patti

Page history last edited by pf1058@txstate.edu 9 years, 10 months ago

 

Submitted by:

Patricia Fidler

Date:

April 8, 2010

Edited by:

Christina Garcia

Date:

April 25, 2010

 

Unit Name:   Geo-Fashion: What are you wearing?   

Unit Length: 6 weeks

Overview:   Students will identify the attributes of three dimensional shapes using models.  Students will count the faces, edges, and vertices on different representations (physical model, computer model, paper) using different strategies. 

DESIRED RESULTS

TEKS and SEs

(4.8) Geometry and spatial reasoning.  The student identifies and describes attributes of geometric figures using formal geometric language.

The student is expected to: (C) use essential attributes to define two- and three- dimensional geometric figures.

Critical Vocabulary

two dimensional, three-dimensional, solid, face, edge, vertex(vertices)

Enduring Understandings (Big Ideas)

Students will understand that three dimensional figures are related to two dimensional shapes.

 

Students will understand the different attributes of three dimensional shapes and how to use different strategies to count these attributes.     

Essential Questions

What are faces? edges? vertices? How are these attributes related to the those of two dimensional shapes?  What strategies can be use to correctly identify and count the faces, edges, and vertices without a physical model?

 

Learning Goals and Objectives

Students will understand the relationship between two dimensional and three dimensional shapes and figures.

 

Students will be able to identify and count the attributes of three dimensional shapes using a variety of strategies.

Materials Needed

Computers – 1 per pair; SMART board (electronic whiteboard); tooth picks; poster board; markers; gumdrops; plastic wrap

ASSESSMENT PLAN

Performance Tasks

Students will correctly identify and count the faces, edges, and vertices of given three-dimensional figures.

 

Other Evidence

Students will apply effective strategies to count the faces, edges, and vertices.

 

LEARNING PLAN

DAY ONE:

 

Engage:   Teacher will place a variety of three-dimensional shapes on the desks for students to see.  Students will watch a short power point presentation on three-dimensional shapes, and then the class will discuss how two and three dimensional shapes are similar and different using a t-chart.  Teacher will share that while some of the attributes are similar; they have different names in three-dimensional shapes.  Teacher will draw a square and a cube on the board.  Students will identify the parts of a square.  Then, students will identify which parts of the cube relate to the square.  Then, the teacher will label the attributes of the cube using the correct terminology (face, edge, and vertex).  The students will define in their own words face, base and edge in their journals.

 

Explore: In groups, students will be given the materials to create their own three-dimensional shapes (7 total).  Using pictures they have been given, they will make each shape using toothpicks and gumdrops (and plastic wrap if needed to visualize).  Once they have completed their shapes, they will use sticky labels to label an edge, a vertex, and a face.  Then they will create a chart on their poster board that shows the number of faces, vertices, and edges each shape has.

 

DAY 2:

 

Explain: Teacher will have students discuss the following questions about yesterday's activity with their group.  Then, students will come together and discuss as a class.  What represented the edges in your shapes?  If we were looking at these shapes on paper, what would represent edges?  What about vertices?  Faces?  What strategies did you use to count the faces? Vertices? Edges?  Out of faces, vertices, and edges, which one was the hardest for you to count?  Why?  Which one may be the most difficult when we have to use a picture on paper?  Why?  What strategies could you use to count on paper?

 

Elaborate:  Using the NCTM’s Illuminations website, http://illuminations.nctm.org/ActivityDetail.aspx?ID=70, students will complete the geometric solids activity in pairs. This activity will help them transition from concrete models in front of them that they can touch to more abstract models that can still be manipulated.  Students will use strategies to count similar to those they will use on paper.  Students will number the figures 1-6 on paper and simply write the number of faces, edges, and vertices they counted.  Using the SMART board, pairs will come up and share the number of faces, edges, and vertices and how they counted them.  The class will discuss how they could use similar strategies when looking at figures on paper.  Using picture examples (similar to those on the TAKS test) on the whiteboard, students will share how to accurately count the faces, edges, and vertices using the strategies they have learned.

 

Evaluate: Throughout the lesson, students (as a group or pair) will be evaluate informally on their ability to correctly identify and count the faces, edges, and vertices of their own models and models on the computer.  Prior to ending the math lesson, students will be formally evaluated independently.  Students will be asked to label and count the faces, edges, and vertices of several (4) three-dimensional figures.

 Time 

 

 

 

 

 

 

30 minutes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

40 minutes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

30 minutes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

30 minutes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10 minutes

Extension: Using their poster board, students can work together to determine the relationship between the number of faces, edges, and vertices and the shape of the base.

 

Modifications: Students will create fewer three-dimensional shapes (4 total).  Students will be given a teacher-created chart to fill in.

 

       

 

 

 

 

Submitted by:

Patricia Fidler

Date:

April 22, 2010

Edited by:

Christina Garcia

Date:

April 28, 2010

 

 

Unit Name: Geo-Fashion: What are you wearing?     

Unit Length:  6 weeks     

Overview: Students will become familiar with the various design techniques used in commercials and ads.  Students will discuss how these techniques are used to influence the feeling or message in an ad or commercial. 

DESIRED RESULTS

TEKS and SEs

4.14B discuss how various design techniques influence the message presented in an ad

Critical Vocabulary:    

persuasion; design techniques; font; pacing; advertising; texture

Enduring Understandings (Big Ideas)

Students will understand that advertising has been specifically designed to present a certain message or feeling to a consumer.    

Essential Questions: How does color influence the feeling of an ad or commercial? Lines? Shapes? Music? Close-ups? Pacing? Font? Does the same technique create the same message in all ads?

 

Learning Goals and Objectives

Students will be able to identify the design techniques used in an ad or commercial and how the use of these techniques influences the feeling of the ad.    

Materials Needed

Magazine ads; videos of commericals; post-its; chart paper

ASSESSMENT PLAN

Performance Tasks

Students will redesign an ad from class by changing at least two design techniques in the ad.  Students will explain how the changes they made changed the feeling or message of the ad.  Students will be assessed on their product using a rubric.

 

Other Evidence

Students are able to list the design techniques in the ads they analyzed and present their favorite one to class.

 

Students participate in the class discussion about the ads and are able to analyze the influence of different techniques on the ads as well as how techniques may have a different impact in different ads.

 

 

LEARNING PLAN

Day one:

 

Engage:  Teacher will show students three different commercials (Prius http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tq4nrmnqY9o, Travelers http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5G7bGBUlx2M, and Dawn soap http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GGcZrqP4f98) and students will write how the commercial made them feel.  Students will share their observations, which will be written on a class chart. 

 

The teacher will share with students that these commercials as well as ads they see in magazines have been designed to get a certain response or feeling using different techniques.  The teacher will discuss the different design techniques (shape, color, line, texture, close-ups, font, pacing, music, and product placement) with the class as she creates a list on the board with brief descriptions.  Students will re-watch the commercial and next to their previous feelings or observations, they will write the design techniques used to elicit that feeling.  The teacher will then call on the students again to share the technique used in commercial and add this to the class chart.

 

Day two:

 

Explore: Teacher will write all design techniques that the students should be looking for on the board and briefly go over each one again from yesterday.  Teacher will give each pair of students several (4-5) ads to analyze together.  Looking at the different ads, students will label the different techniques they observe (shape, color, line, texture, close-ups, font, etc) that influence the feeling of the ad using post-it notes.    The students will list each element on a piece of chart paper and write how that element was used in the ads.  Students will choose their favorite ad to share with the class tomorrow. 

 

Day three:

 

Explain: Students will share their favorite ad and discuss the techniques the ad used.  Once all pairs have shared their ads and these are displayed where the students can see them, they will discuss the activity and design techniques as a class.  How did color influence the feeling of the ads?  Did certain colors make you feel a certain way?  Was the placement of the product important in the ad?  What did you notice about the font (writing) used in the ads?  If different ads used the same colors, lines, or shapes, was the feeling the same?  Why or why not?  

 

Day four:

 

Elaborate: In their pairs, students will pick one ad they found to redesign in some way to change the message or feeling of the ad.  Students will illustrate their new ad.  Students must be able to explain the techniques used in the original ad, the change(s) they made, why they made the change(s), and how the message or feeling was changed. Prior to starting their work, teacher will provide the students with the rubric for evaluating their ads.

 

Evaluate: Students will present the original ad and their redesigned ads to the class sharing how the redesigned ad made them feel or how the message was changed from the original ad.  Students re-designed ads will be assessed using a rubric.

 

 Time

     

 

 

 

45 minutes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

45 minutes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

45 minutes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

45  minutes 

Extension: Students can create a commercial (skit) for a product that would incorporate several design techniques.  Then, students would change the commercial to alter the message or feeling using the same design techniques.  

 

**At the end of the unit, students will be creating their own ad for the clothing and/or accessories they created in math class.  In this ad, they will apply the design techniques they learned to influence how consumers feel about their products.

 

Modifications:  Students will analyze fewer ads (2) during class.  Students will be provided with a list of the techniques and how the different techniques are used in ads to influence feeling to help with their analysis.

 

       

 

 

Rubric for Ad Re-design

 

1.  Students explained the design techniques in the original ad, including how the techniques influenced the feeling of the ad

 

         1                          2                              3                                  4                                  5

NOT AT ALL TRUE                          SOMEWHAT TRUE                                                   VERY TRUE

 

2.   Students listed the changes they made to the ad using the specific design techniques

 

       1                                2                          3                                           4                         5

NOT AT ALL TRUE                          SOMEWHAT TRUE                                                    VERY TRUE

 

3.  students changed at least two design techniques in the new ad.

       1                                2                          3                                           4                         5

NOT AT ALL TRUE                          SOMEWHAT TRUE                                                    VERY TRUE

 

4.  Students explained how the changes they made influenced or changed the feeling of the ad

        1                              2                               3                                      4                         5

NOT AT ALL TRUE                          SOMEWHAT TRUE                                                    VERY TRUE

 

5.  Students illustrated the re-designed ad neatly and it is colored

        1                              2                          3                                            4                         5

NOT AT ALL TRUE                          SOMEWHAT TRUE                                                     VERY TRUE

 

6.  The re-designed ad is recognizable as the original ad (same product, overall look, etc.) with only changes in the design techniques

        1                              2                         3                                         4                           5

NOT AT ALL TRUE                          SOMEWHAT TRUE                                                  VERY TRUE

 

 

 

 

 

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