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Quintessence Lesson Plans - Denise

Page history last edited by dd1293@txstate.edu 10 years, 3 months ago

                                          

 

Comparing Tetrahedrons and Triangles                                               

 

 

Submitted by: Denise Doyle Date: April 3, 2010
Edited by:
Date:

 

 

Unit Name: Let's Go Fly a Kite

Unit Section: Exploring triangles and Tetrahedrons

Unit Focus:  Connecting attributes of 2D and 3D triangles

Unit Length: 6 weeks
Overview: Teacher will lead students to see common attributes with pre-planned questions in an investigation of 3-D tetrahedron. Students will determine number of sides, verices, faces, on 2-D and 3-D triangular shapes. 
DESIRED RESULTS: 
 

 

TEKS and SE's

K (8) Geometry and spatial reasoning.  The student uses attributes to determine how objects are alike and different.  (A) describe and identify an object by it attributes using informal language; (B) compare two objects based on their attributes

 K(9)The student recognizes attributes of two- and three dimensional geometric figures (A)describe and compare the attributes of real-life objects such as balls, boxes, cans, or model of three-dimensional figures (B) recognize shapes in real-life three-dimensional figures or models (C) describe, identify, and compare circles, triangles, rectangles and squares

1(7) Geometry and Spatial reasoning.  The student uses attributes to identify two- and three- dimensional geometric figures.  The student compares and contrasts two- and three- dimensional figures or both (A) describe and identify two-dimensional geometric figures, including circles, triangles, rectangles, and squares. (B) Describe and identify three-dimensional geometric figures, including spheres, rectangular prisms, cylinders, and cones. (C) describe and identify two- and three-dimensional geometric figures in order to sort them according to a given attribute using formal and informal language.(D) use concrete models to combine two-dimensional geometric figures to make new geometric figures

Critical Vocabulary

Triangle, equilateral triangle, tetrahedron, vertices, vertex, sides, edges, corners, faces, congruent, length, area, perimeter, space, relationships, attributes

 Words are posted on a math vocabulary wall with supporting picture.

Enduring Understandings (Big Ideas) Two- and three-dimensional figures are related by their common attributes.

Essential Questions

Can you tell me attributes needed to identify a polygon?  Can you isolate attributes that you see when shown a tetrahedron?  Explain how you know a shape is a triangle? Can you organize your triangles into a 3 dimensional shape?  How do you know it is 3 D?

Learning Goals and Objectives

Students will distinguish (examine in detail) attributes of tetrahedrons and triangles using straws and sticky string.

Materials Needed

Straws (large in diameter), sticky string, card stock template, tissue paper, scissors, glue sticks.  Day 1 - check out Lap tops for students to use for kite project.  Day 2 - older students/parents collaborate and help students tie kites/trace templete for kite.

 

ASSESSMENT PLAN:

Rubric

Name– 10 points

Creation of 1 triangle using math vocabulary - 20

Verbal pair share using math vocabulary – 20 points

Participation in building 3-D tetrahedronal kite – 30 points

 Presentations using Elmo projector and/or digital camera – 20 points

 

 

 

Performance Tasks

 

Students will name poylons on 3-D figures. 

 

Other Evidence

Students’ ability to verbalize attributes of triangle and tetrehdron.

Students' ability to use new math vocabulary. 

Students ability to identify attributes that are the same and different. 

 

 

 

 

LEARNING PLAN:

Engage: Teacher will introduce tetrahedrons 3-D plastic shape. Do we know the name of this shape?  What other 2-D shapes do we see?  How can we use 2-D shapes to create a 3-D shape? The Greedy Triangle by Marilyn Burns                                            

 

Explore: Day one: K-1st students will be handed a tetrahedron solid.  Questions to ask: Do we know the name of this shape?  Can we identify attributes that we do know?  Edges? Sides? Vertices?  What polygon do we see on the faces/bases: Have students count number of sides, vertices, and edges.  Record findings.  Tell students that they are going to create a kite shaped like our solid.  Today we will focus on creating one face or triangle with straws and sticky string. What can we do to create theses triangles?  How many sides will we need?  This is where we would go to the web site  http://nlvm.usu.edu/en/nav/topic_t_3.html click on platonic solids.

 Create on screen a tetrahedron and use tool bar to change the colors of the edges and faces to count needed number of sides and faces. What would we need to create the faces we see on this solid? What polygon did we identify for all of the faces. How many faces?  What happens when we connect a side? Are all the sides congruent?  Why are they the same length?  Have a pile of pre-cut straws for students to build all four faces.  While referencing the tetrahedron on the screen, I would ask what happens when sides are connected?  Are there two sides now? Each student would then string three segments of the straws and create a triangle.  Easily twisting the sticky string. Compare number of triangles to number of sides on tetrahedron.  Are they the same why/why not? Have students confirm length congruency with other students' triangles. Leading question for tomorrow:  Can we connect these pieces together to create a kite? Teacher and students will need to reference this web site for step by step instructions for a tetrahedronal kite. http://britton.disted.camosun.bc.ca/tetrakite/tetra.html dents

Day 2 will require a support group of 5 or more parent/student volunteers. Hand each student their triangle created in the prior lesson.  How many triangles do we need to create a solid or tetrahedron?  Have students hold triangles together and discuss ways to connect the sides to create four faces.  Today we are going to create a tetrahedronal kite following sequencial steps.  We will use tissue paper, straws, string, and tape. Support volunteers will work in cooperative groups of 3 or 4 students and follow along with the web site instructions using the supplies listed. with following the intructions for creating a kite using a step by step procedures using this web site. Each group will create 1 kite for our science experiment with wind for the next day.

 

 Explain:   Have student put into their own words what was the same/differnet about the triangle and the solid.  Students will be able to explain four congruent faces, 6 congruent sides, and 4 vertices.  This would be a good place to discuss and explain the need for congruent line segments to make this 3-dimensional shape work. 

 

Elaborate:  

Have students write one sentence using a new math vocabulary word about their kite.

 

 

EvaluateUse rubric created to evaluate student’s success.  Students may choose to present to small groups using digital camera picture or may present to the large group using Elmo to display tetrahedron.

 

 

 

 

Time:
5-10 minutes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Day 1

45 mins

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Day 2

60 mins

 

 

 

 

 

 

  5 mins

 

 

 

 3-5 mins

 

 

 3-5 mins

 

 

Lesson Resources

Extensions Students will attempt to fly their own group's kite in the following lesson.  We can connect the individual kites into one large class kite.  Have students justify why this will work?  Will this work with other 3D shapes?
Modifications:  

Have a net for a triangular pyramid for students to fold.  Have a template of a triangle for students to trace that can be glued to create a net for 3D shape.  Have 4 congruent triangles pre-pared for students that need to see shapes prior to activity.  Post definitions of vocabulary with pictures as needed for students to reference.

 

 

 

                                           

 

Discovery of Wind Energy                                            

 

 

Submitted by: Denise Doyle
Date:  4/19/10
Edited by:
Date:

 

 

Unit Name: Let's Go Fly A Kite
Unit Length: 6 weeks
Overview: Teacher will help students discover wind as a source for energy using their kites.  Students develop a hypothosis, collect data, and make a conclusion using their kites and wind.
DESIRED RESULTS:

TEKS and SE's

 

§112.2. Science, Kindergarten.

 

(b) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Scientific processes. The student participates in classroom and field investigations following home and school safety procedures. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate safe practices during classroom and field investigations; and

(B) learn how to use and conserve resources and materials.

(2) Scientific processes. The student develops abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry in the field and the classroom. The student is expected to:

(A) ask questions about organisms, objects, and events;

(B) plan and conduct simple descriptive investigations;

(C) gather information using simple equipment and tools to extend the senses;

(D) construct reasonable explanations using information; and

(E) communicate findings about simple investigations.

(3) Scientific processes. The student knows that information and critical thinking are used in making decisions. The student is expected to:

(A) make decisions using information;

(B) discuss and justify the merits of decisions; and

(C) explain a problem in his/her own words and propose a solution.

(4) Scientific processes. The student uses age-appropriate tools and models to verify that organisms and objects and parts of organisms and objects can be observed, described, and measured. The student is expected to:

(A) identify and use senses as tools of observation; and

(B) make observations using tools including hand lenses, balances, cups, bowls, and computers.

(7) Science concepts. The student knows that many types of change occur. The student is expected to:

(C) observe and record weather changes from day to day and over seasons;

 

§112.3. Science, Grade 1.

(b)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Scientific processes. The student conducts classroom and field investigations following home and school safety procedures. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate safe practices during classroom and field investigations; and

(B)  learn how to use and conserve resources and materials.

(2)  Scientific processes. The student develops abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry in the field and the classroom. The student is expected to:

(A)  ask questions about organisms, objects, and events;

(B)  plan and conduct simple descriptive investigations;

(C)  gather information using simple equipment and tools to extend the senses;

(D)  construct reasonable explanations and draw conclusions; and

(E)  communicate explanations about investigations.

(3)  Scientific processes. The student knows that information and critical thinking are used in making decisions. The student is expected to:

(A)  make decisions using information;

(B)  discuss and justify the merits of decisions; and

(C)  explain a problem in his/her own words and identify a task and solution related to the problem.

(4)  Scientific processes. The student uses age-appropriate tools and models to verify that organisms and objects and parts of organisms and objects can be observed, described, and measured. The student is expected to:

(A)  collect information using tools including hand lenses, clocks, computers, thermometers, and balances;

(B)  record and compare collected information; and

(C)  measure organisms and objects and parts of organisms and objects, using non-standard units such as paper clips, hands, and pencils.

 

Materials Needed 

Cotton string

Popcicle sticks

Kites created in prior lesson

straws

Electric Fan 

Scotch tape

Learning Goals or Objectives

Students will identify wind as a source of energy using a kite.

Critical Vocabulary

air

movement

velocity

speed

lift

height

kite

trapped

size

mass

energy source

Hypothosis

conclusion

observation

data collection

chart

organize

 

 

Enduring Understandings (Big Ideas)
Wind/Air is a inexhaustable source of energy.

Essential Questions
How do kites work?  How do we know if a kite is flying?  What will we see?

Can you isolate a reason it will or will not fly?

Who's kite will fly higher?  How can we organize our data?  What do we want to know about our kites?  Describe what we need to see so we can speculate if our kites will fly?

 

ASSESSMENT PLAN:
Science Experiment Rubric

Name in Journal - 10 points

Write hypothesis in Science Journal - 15 points

Attempt to Fly Kite - 25 points

Verbal Contribution to Data collection by class - 25 points

Completetion of Data chart in journal using tally marks - 15 points

Encouragement to others during experiments - 10 points

Performance Tasks
Students will work together in a collaborative group

lead by parents to form 1 tetrahedron sections for class kite.

Other Evidence
Students ability to identify source of power.

Students ability to verbalize how kites work.

LEARNING PLAN:
We will explain how the shape of the kite along with wind as an energy source our kite will fly.

Engage: What makes a kite work?  Timed thinking for 1 minutes.  Then have students pair-share with partners what energy source they think could move a kite.  Read "The Wind Blew" by Pat Hutchins then let children complete the experiment.  Encourage them to find a way to prove their idea or hypothesis for energy.

 

Explore: Teacher will move a kite on the desk with her hand and then move it by blowing through a straw.  Question: What made the kite move?  Have students pair-share their ideas for the enery source.  Then allow the students to move their own kites using a straw.  Is there another way we could make the kite move?  Thinking questions that could be asked are:  Whose kite moved?  Why?  What does this tell us about flying kites outside?  What will our energy be if we don't blow? Students will write hypothesis in book after discussion. Wind will cause my kite to fly. Teacher will need to pre-cut 6 yards string segments for each student.  Attach string to kite using scotch tape.  Then roll excess string around popcicle stick.  Take kites outside and allow to fly kites.  Teacher will need to scribe dialoge between students and make observational notes to use in class discussion.  Time for flight should be 15 minutes. 

 

Explain: Have question pre-written on the board.  Did your kite fly?  What was your energy source?  Have a chart and record student observations. Students will organize data on a poster board.  The poster board would be a chart divided in half. Have the students brainstorm how to title the poster as the reflect back on our journal hypothesis. Create a matrix with four squares title top with fly Yes/No and then the side would be titled by energy source. Running/Wind

 Then each child would make a tally mark in appropriate column and discuss data collected.  Allow children to justify their response to their hypothesis.

 

Elaborate: Students would work in table teams to make a list or draw objects powered by air.

 

 Evaluate: Student teams would fill out the evaluation rubric with the teacher.  Teacher needs to listen for connection of wind and power.

 

 

 

Time:
10 mins

 

 

40

mins

 

 

 

 

 

15 mins

Lesson ResourcesLesson Resources Lesson Resources

Extensions:   If we connect all of our tetrahedronal kites will the class kite fly?  Have students decide if the wind is powerful enought to fly the larger kite?  I would have one made prior to this and we would go out and test this hypothesis.
Modifications:  IF there is no wind, brainstorm solutions for how to make wind.  Example: running,walking fast, dropping from a given height, etc...

 

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